Land of Ash and Glass

Home to the Heir of Rage

10,928 notes

natsulasommer:

prettyinpwn:

natsulasommer:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

factsbrain:

Like all living things, humans are bio­luminescent (meaning we glow) – We glow brightest during the afternoon. - weird, interesting & funny facts

what

i’ve been staring at this for like 5 minutes. so.. what. i don’t think people glow. but this is telling me that we actually emit visible light.. especially in the afternoon?? am i reading this right or what

"all living things" plants. when do the plants glow

science side of tumblr pls

I’m not from the science side of tumblr, but here’s the answer anyways:
 Basically, all living things are bioluminescent because every living thing has chemical reactions occurring in their cells. The energy created from these chemical reactions physically manifests as light, thus… all living things naturally glow.
 However, this glow cannot be seen by the human eye. In fact, the only way they’ve ever captured this light is through special cameras. Using these ultra special cameras, they’ve imaged subjects’ bodies over 24 hour periods. It has been found out that humans emit the most of this glow during the afternoon (about 4 PM), it is the weakest in the morning (about 10 AM), and the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, neck, and forehead.
The light is about a thousand times weaker than what humans can perceive.
 Basically, it’s a side effect of metabolic reactions. It’s been suspected that humans are bioluminescent for years, but they weren’t able to confirm it until recently thanks to technology and a man named Masaki Kobayashi from the Tohoku Institute of Technology.
 Sources:
http://scienceblogs.com/notrocketscience/2009/07/20/photographing-the-glow-of-the-human-body/
http://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2009/jul/17/human-bioluminescence
http://www.livescience.com/7799-strange-humans-glow-visible-light.html

10/10 explaination
10/10 source
10/10 time to answer
overal 10/10
you are now offiicially from the science side of tumblr.
and thank you

natsulasommer:

prettyinpwn:

natsulasommer:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

hikikotaku:

factsbrain:

Like all living things, humans are bio­luminescent (meaning we glow) – We glow brightest during the afternoon. weirdinteresting & funny facts

what

i’ve been staring at this for like 5 minutes. so.. what. i don’t think people glow. but this is telling me that we actually emit visible light.. especially in the afternoon?? am i reading this right or what

"all living things" plants. when do the plants glow

science side of tumblr pls

I’m not from the science side of tumblr, but here’s the answer anyways:

 Basically, all living things are bioluminescent because every living thing has chemical reactions occurring in their cells. The energy created from these chemical reactions physically manifests as light, thus… all living things naturally glow.

 However, this glow cannot be seen by the human eye. In fact, the only way they’ve ever captured this light is through special cameras. Using these ultra special cameras, they’ve imaged subjects’ bodies over 24 hour periods. It has been found out that humans emit the most of this glow during the afternoon (about 4 PM), it is the weakest in the morning (about 10 AM), and the brightest light is emitted from the cheeks, neck, and forehead.

The light is about a thousand times weaker than what humans can perceive.

 Basically, it’s a side effect of metabolic reactions. It’s been suspected that humans are bioluminescent for years, but they weren’t able to confirm it until recently thanks to technology and a man named Masaki Kobayashi from the Tohoku Institute of Technology.

 Sources:

http://scienceblogs.com/notrocketscience/2009/07/20/photographing-the-glow-of-the-human-body/

http://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2009/jul/17/human-bioluminescence

http://www.livescience.com/7799-strange-humans-glow-visible-light.html

10/10 explaination

10/10 source

10/10 time to answer

overal 10/10

you are now offiicially from the science side of tumblr.

and thank you

(via flyingchocolatebunny)

491 notes

toastyhat:

glooptastic:

A sketch commission I did for toastyhat who wanted Kankri and the Signless yelling at each other! It was fun drawing these two dorks haha :D

I think the red faces just absolutely make it omg thank you so much gloopy! @O@Long will we wonder what subject they could’ve ended up on to make each other so mad. uvu

toastyhat:

glooptastic:

A sketch commission I did for toastyhat who wanted Kankri and the Signless yelling at each other! It was fun drawing these two dorks haha :D

I think the red faces just absolutely make it omg thank you so much gloopy! @O@

Long will we wonder what subject they could’ve ended up on to make each other so mad. uvu

(via hasanashomestuckcave)

29,690 notes

imagine-jim-bones-and-spock:

imagine spock going back to vulcan to be honored with an award for scientific excellency or whatever

and even though its an award ceremony its still very solemn theres no clapping or cheering when people come on stage

finally its spocks turn and as he bows to the high priest and straightens up to receive his medal he hears a REALLY LOUD whistle from the audience

and he turns around and jims in the middle of all these stone faced vulcans like

image

(via pep-squad-levi)

256,490 notes

chiibinomonodamon:

mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.
It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.
Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.
Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.
We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.
People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.


I got lost in Tokyo and was able to rely on two guys on bikes to guide me back to my hotel.
In Harajuku, I complimented a lolita girl and asked her if there was a store nearby where I could buy clothes like that and she took me all the way down  the street to it!

chiibinomonodamon:

mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.

It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.

Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.

Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.

We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.

People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.

I got lost in Tokyo and was able to rely on two guys on bikes to guide me back to my hotel.

In Harajuku, I complimented a lolita girl and asked her if there was a store nearby where I could buy clothes like that and she took me all the way down  the street to it!

(Source: sinnumero, via princesskennymccormick)

54,121 notes

lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

smokingladiesman submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.
Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

 submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.

Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

(via princesskennymccormick)